Meme of the week: I forgot to take my highly addictive drugs

i forgot to take my addictive medication

It’s simply unimaginable that doctors would treat patients this way with any other condition than adhd. But because adhd is generally not taken very seriously by doctors or psychiatrists, this is an easy group of patients to bully. I know that is a harsh word in 2024, but after hearing so many stories about the shitty diminishing way that doctors talk to people with adhd, I think it is appropriate to call it as such.

Essential reading—Laziness Does not Exist by Devon Price

Scolding

All of us with neurological and metabolic differences need to hear the title of this book ring in our ears, because to use the language of laziness against others or ourselves is to do a kind of judgmental violence that is neither accurate nor effective.

On self-love

Anticipation

We live in the present of our predicted futures.

A Critical Review of an adhd classic: Driven to Distraction

Distracted

But there is a central issue that I have with the literature on adhd, and this is a problem with this book and with the field more generally. My issue is this: why distraction? Or perhaps the question could be asked in the following way: distraction from what?

Perfectionism, Part I: The Problem of the Product

Perfectionism causes personal and professional problems for perfectionists themselves and those around them. And, in a bitter twist of irony, it turns out to be an inefficient and ineffective way of producing good work with any consistency. Perfectionism is not segregated in any single population, but it is one of the most common difficulties experienced by people with adhd.

Feelings vs Emotions, Part II: Dirty Fuels and Fatigue

Paper vs Scissors

In Part 1 of Feelings vs Emotions, I explored the definitional and substantive differences between feelings and emotions. I wrote about the relationship between interoception—the senses that offer information about the state of our body—and the binary feeling of good/bad. In today’s post, I will focus on emotions. “Emotions,” as Damasio notes in Part 1 “indicate actions,” and then later describes them as “concerts of actions.”